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Saturday, 03 November

21:00

Rosehill Garden Concert "IndyWatch Feed Allaunews"

Saturday 3rd Nov, 10.00am Sunday 4th Nov, 4.00pm, Rosehill Farm
Ripplebrook

Tuesday, 16 October

02:36

Luban makes landfall in Yemen, dropping heavy rain "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Very Severe Cyclonic Storm "Luban" weakened into a tropical depression just before it made landfall in southeastern Yemen, between Mukalla and Al Ghaidahnear, near the border with Oman on October 14, 2018. This is the 5th named storm of the 2018 North...... Read more

Red alert in Aude, massive flash floods leave at least 7 dead, schools closed, France "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Meteo France issued Red alert for rain and flooding for the department of Aude in southwestern France early Monday, October 15, 2018. The region received exceptional amounts of rain in just several hours, causing major flash flooding in which at least 7 people lost...... Read more

$25m in funding to help African govts prosecute poachers, traffickers "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

A prominent African wildlife conservation NGO has committed $25 million to help protect iconic fauna from poaching and habitat loss across the continent by investing in African institutions and people. We are seeing recovery and stabilization of some critical wildlife populations, Kaddu Sebunya, president of the African Wildlife Foundation (AWF), said in a statement. We know what is working and its time to scale up the investment to combat this serious threat. The Nairobi-based organization made the announcement on Oct. 11 during the Illegal Wildlife Trade conference in London. The money will complement more than $13 million that AWF says it has used to support projects aimed at countering the illegal trade of wildlife and wildlife products. The African Wildlife Foundations work includes programs to stop the loss of habitat for large carnivores, such as cheetahs. Image by John C. Cannon/Mongabay. If we can keep wildlife safe from poachers, make wildlife products difficult to move around, actively involve key local players, and dampen the demand for wildlife products, then Africas magnificent animals have a fighting chance, Philip Muruthi, AWFs chief scientist, said in the statement. Current AWF projects include training sniffer dogs credited with detecting the presence of more than 250 illicit shipments of wildlife products; engaging with communities to encourage economic development that also supports conservation; and equipping wildlife rangers with the tools they need to catch poachers. This infusion of funds will go toward bolstering the capacity of authorities, specifically judges and prosecutors, to hold poachers and traffickers

Can we buy our way out of the sixth extinction? "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

Money, its said, makes the world go round. The old adage appears to be true in conservation, too: A paper in Nature tracked $14.4 billion spent on conservation programs over a 12-year period around the world, and found that it was money well spent. All the money we have been spending on conservation has actually made a difference, says Anthony Waldron, lead author of the paper and research fellow at the National University of Singapore. To understand if spending was effectively making a difference in conservation, the authors compiled a dataset that took into account both species decline and conservation funding per capita in 109 countries. The researchers also looked at how development population growth, industrial expansion, and agriculture contributed to biodiversity loss. The model found that while development and GDP growth affected biodiversity negatively, money spent on conservation greatly reduced those impacts. In the 109 countries studied, all of them signatories to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, the researchers found a median average reduction of 29 percent of species loss per country as a result of the billions spent in the period from 1996 to 2008. If we hadnt spent the money, we would have lost a third more biodiversity than we did, Waldron tells wildlife.org. The researchers also found that nearly two-thirds of global biodiversity loss during that period was concentrated in just seven countries: Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, India, Australia and the United States (the latter

123 baby giant tortoises stolen from Galpagos breeding center "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

On the night of Sept. 24, 123 giant tortoise hatchlings were stolen from the Arnaldo Tupiza breeding center on Isabela, the largest island in the Galpagos. The hatchlings belonged to two species, the Cerro Azul (Chelonoidis vicina) and Sierra Negra (Chelonoidis guntheri) giant tortoises, the Ministry of Environment of Ecuador said in a statement. Both species are listed as endangered on the IUCN Red List. The theft is under investigation by the Galpagos attorney generals office, the ministry said, and they are withholding further information to avoid obstruction of the work of the competent authorities. A week-old Galapagos tortoise. Image by Peder Toftegaard Olsen via Flickr (CC BY-ND 2.0). Native to the Galpagos Islands, the Galpagos giant tortoises have experienced a severe population decline over the past decades, caused mainly by hunting for meat and oil, the introduction of non-native animals like goats, rats and pigs to the islands, and agricultural expansion. Today, only 10 of the 15 known species of Galpagos giant tortoise survive in the wild all either severely threatened or on the brink of extinction. Captive-breeding efforts to save the tortoises from extinction began in 1965. The Arnaldo Tupiza breeding center, established in 1993, is one of three tortoise centers in the Galpagos created to help restore giant tortoise numbers in the wild. All three facilities are managed by the Galpagos National Park Directorate. Located on Isabela Island, the Arnaldo Tupiza center spans 2 hectares (5 acres) for the captive breeding of giant tortoises, according to the environment ministrys statement. It

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01:44

anger management certificate of completion template "IndyWatch Feed Allcommunity"

anger management certificate of completion template

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